Parenthood
Dad claps back after trolls flood him with comments about his teen daughters’ homecoming dresses
When this dad shared a photo of him and his daughters on Homecoming day, he never expected the internet would have so much to say.
D.G. Sciortino
11.08.22

Unfortunately, we still live in a world where people don’t mind their own business and think they have the right to tell other people how to live their lives.

And, even worse, a society where women are oppressed.

Some are forced to cover their heads and faces without being given a choice and are murdered if they don’t comply. While others are forced to give birth against their will.

Child marriage is even legal in 44 states in the U.S., according to Equality Now. But not all men fear women’s power and independence.

One father is vehemently defending it.

Orlando news anchor Matt Austin wasn’t about to let a bunch of online Karens and Kens slut-shame his daughters or tell him how to parent.

Austin was having a “proud dad moment” and posted a photo of his daughters all dressed up for homecoming.

“My daughters look a little too good on homecoming night. Believe it or not, they’re even more beautiful on the inside,” he wrote in the Facebook post’s caption.

He was in “total shock” over the reaction the post got.

“As I looked, I saw sort of the nasty comments, that I’m a bad father, how could you, so scandalous, that sort of rhetoric happening,” said Austin. “I was stunned.”

More than a thousand people commented on the post, and not everyone had nice things to say.

Some commented that they would never “let” their daughters leave the house “looking for sale.”

They also shamed Austin and other parents who “send the young ladies out with everything showing!”

“It was a total shock — to me, the outfits weren’t controversial,” Austin told Today Parents. “I wondered, ‘What makes a bad dress?’ and ‘Why are people policing me?’ And ‘Why is it okay to talk about someone’s children like this?’ “

@flnewsman A dad responds to Karens taking aim at teen daughters’ Homecoming dresses. #fashiontiktok #parentsoftiktok#fypシ #hoco ♬ original sound – mattja83

Austin, who as three children, was seriously pissed off about the disgusting comments he witnessed and had to respond to the “Karens taking aim at teen daughters’ Homecoming dresses.”

He posted a video on TikTok that ended up getting 6.5 million views.

“The one thing that has always pissed me off as a father of girls is when people say things like, ‘Well, these girls need to dress so they don’t distract the boys,’ ” he said. “Or even worse: ‘They’re dressing a way in which they’re asking for it.’ “

He went on to explain that it is not a woman’s responsibility for the inappropriate thoughts or actions of men.

“Let’s get something crystal clear now. It’s not my daughters’ job to make sure your son is focused in school. Also not her job to dress hideous enough to where your son doesn’t assault her,” he added. “It’s your job to not raise a pervert with no self-control.”


Austin admitted that the dresses his daughters wore wouldn’t have been his first choice.

If he had it his way, his girls would be in Snuggies 24-7.

Still, he knows that the consequences of policing his daughter’s wardrobes are far worse than nasty comments on the internet.

@flnewsman Thank you! I truly appreciate all of your kind words. #fashiontiktok #parents ♬ original sound – mattja83

“If I start dictating what my daughters wear, I’m going to teach them three things: A, They’ll start to hate me for arbitrary rules, B, they’ll start to lie to me or C, maybe even worse, that it’s okay for a man to tell them what to wear because they look too good,” said Austin.

“But you know what would really disappoint me? If my girls grew up to be the kind of adult who goes on social media and demeans a teen’s appearance on her father’s Facebook page. Now that’s what I call trashy.”

Learn more about how this dad handled the trolls in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

By D.G. Sciortino
hi@sbly.com
D.G. is a contributing writer in Shareably. She's based in Connecticut and can be reached at hi@shareably.net.
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