Parenthood
Moms who swear apparently make the best parents according to parenting experts
I hate to say that I'm a little guilty of this on occasion. But it's so nice to know I'm not the only one.
Safet Satara
01.05.22

Experts still weigh whether or not we should swear around our kids, but the fact remains.

Swearing relieves pain.

Yes, that’s right. Scientists have proven that using profanity in stressful situations makes things more bearable.

Now, we all know that children can help you pile up the stress in no time.

Unsplash - Keren Fedida
Source:
Unsplash - Keren Fedida

Next time you feel like using the f word in front of your kiddos, you might as well do so.

Psychologists claim that a child should learn the difference between a slur and a swear at home rather than elsewhere.

Believe it or not, sweary parents seem to be doing it right. Keep reading to find out all the reasons why.

Is swearing really that bad?

For the record: hate speech and offensive words should never be encouraged. Moreover, never swear at your kid in anger. That’s a whole different problem.

We are talking about parents who feel guilty for having occasional profane tendencies. Yes, we know-you’re child has reached the “repeat everything mommy and daddy says” age.

Unsplash - Sai De Silva
Source:
Unsplash - Sai De Silva

They’ll be exposed regardless.

However, potty-mouthed people are everywhere. Chances are, your child will pick up a few or more undesirable words either way.

What do you think happens when you leave kids at kindergarten or school, for example? That’s right. They’re exposed to different contents, including other kids’ swearing.

Unsplash - Mick Haupt
Source:
Unsplash - Mick Haupt

Can you be a parent who doesn’t give an eff about swearing in front of their children?

Kate Levkoff, a cohost on parenting podcast Nursing and Cursing, published a hilarious article on Scary Mommy.

“I need to give true voice to my feelings as I dig the embedded Lego Batman from my heel (ahhhgain), bake and frost 24 cupcakes at 1 a.m. for the class party at 8 a.m., or try to make sense of third-grade math,” says Levkoff explaining that, as a parent, she has given up so much s*it already.

There’s something to be said for it.

Another columnist and author, Emma Brockes, claims that she would rather use swearing than fake cheer in front of her children.

On the other hand, Sarah Rosensweet, a parenting coach of Toronto, explains it’s all up to you.

If you feel OK with your children swearing, then swear around them, and vice versa.

Could it be that simple?! Yes.

Why do children swear?

According to parenting experts, children mainly swear to express negative emotions, fit in, or get a strong reaction from their parents.

Keep essential information in mind: when children are forbidden to do something, they’ll want to do it even more.

Unsplash - Adrian Cogua
Source:
Unsplash - Adrian Cogua

Stay calm when your child swears and explain clearly that the wor they used are not OK. If you laugh or yell at them, kiddos will likely enjoy the attention and do it again.

Talk to your children, let them know that it’s OK to feel negative emotions, but suggest another form of expression.

We all feel frustrated sometimes.

Parenting coach Maureen Dennis says that children have a lot to figure out when it comes to verbalizing their feelings.

Your child should know that it’s OK to feel angry, but it’s better to express it in more appropriate words.

Also, try having a conversation with your child about their friends who swear. Ask the kids why they think their peers swear?

Remember that you can’t expect your child to listen to you 100% when it comes to friends because they are a significant influence.

As long as your kid understands which words are less offensive, you’re good to go.

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Upgrade your vocabulary.

You might not want to hear this one but work on yourself if you’re going to set a good example. Use the words you want your child to use in everyday life.

Be aware of what your child watches and plays with.

We all grow up with our children. Don’t blame yourself for using a few big words along the way.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Safet Satara
hi@sbly.com
Safet Satara is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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